Occupy Wall Street demands are vaguely familiar

The protestors on Wall Street known as ‘Occupy Wall Street’ have recently been identified by a list of demands evidently posted by one of their followers. Though there are no official demands by the group, the list does serve to encapsulate the sentiment of the protestors and give some sort of meaning to their action.

A quick look at the demands will recall some of the more interesting manifestos of the past. The demands as reported on their website:

Demand one: Restoration of the living wage. This demand can only be met by ending “Freetrade” by re-imposing trade tariffs on all imported goods entering the American market to level the playing field for domestic family farming and domestic manufacturing as most nations that are dumping cheap products onto the American market have radical wage and environmental regulation advantages. Another policy that must be instituted is raise the minimum wage to twenty dollars an hr.

Demand two: Institute a universal single payer healthcare system. To do this all private insurers must be banned from the healthcare market as their only effect on the health of patients is to take money away from doctors, nurses and hospitals preventing them from doing their jobs and hand that money to wall st. investors.

Demand three: Guaranteed living wage income regardless of employment.

Demand four: Free college education.

Demand five: Begin a fast track process to bring the fossil fuel economy to an end while at the same bringing the alternative energy economy up to energy demand.

Demand six: One trillion dollars in infrastructure (Water, Sewer, Rail, Roads and Bridges and Electrical Grid) spending now.

Demand seven: One trillion dollars in ecological restoration planting forests, reestablishing wetlands and the natural flow of river systems and decommissioning of all of America’s nuclear power plants.

Demand eight: Racial and gender equal rights amendment.

Demand nine: Open borders migration. anyone can travel anywhere to work and live.

Demand ten: Bring American elections up to international standards of a paper ballot precinct counted and recounted in front of an independent and party observers system.

Demand eleven: Immediate across the board debt forgiveness for all. Debt forgiveness of sovereign debt, commercial loans, home mortgages, home equity loans, credit card debt, student loans and personal loans now! All debt must be stricken from the “Books.” World Bank Loans to all Nations, Bank to Bank Debt and all Bonds and Margin Call Debt in the stock market including all Derivatives or Credit Default Swaps, all 65 trillion dollars of them must also be stricken from the “Books.” And I don’t mean debt that is in default, I mean all debt on the entire planet period.

Demand twelve: Outlaw all credit reporting agencies.

Demand thirteen: Allow all workers to sign a ballot at any time during a union organizing campaign or at any time that represents their yeah or nay to having a union represent them in collective bargaining or to form a union.

Those who know their 20th century history will immediately see the correlation between these and those demands made by president Franklin Roosevelt in his 1944 State of the Union:

It is our duty now to begin to lay the plans and determine the strategy for the winning of a lasting peace and the establishment of an American standard of living higher than ever before known. We cannot be content, no matter how high that general standard of living may be, if some fraction of our people—whether it be one-third or one-fifth or one-tenth—is ill-fed, ill-clothed, ill-housed, and insecure.

This Republic had its beginning, and grew to its present strength, under the protection of certain inalienable political rights—among them the right of free speech, free press, free worship, trial by jury, freedom from unreasonable searches and seizures. They were our rights to life and liberty.

As our nation has grown in size and stature, however—as our industrial economy expanded—these political rights proved inadequate to assure us equality in the pursuit of happiness.

We have come to a clear realization of the fact that true individual freedom cannot exist without economic security and independence. “Necessitous men are not free men.” People who are hungry and out of a job are the stuff of which dictatorships are made.

In our day these economic truths have become accepted as self-evident. We have accepted, so to speak, a second Bill of Rights under which a new basis of security and prosperity can be established for all—regardless of station, race, or creed.

Among these are:

The right to a useful and remunerative job in the industries or shops or farms or mines of the nation;

The right to earn enough to provide adequate food and clothing and recreation;

The right of every farmer to raise and sell his products at a return which will give him and his family a decent living;

The right of every businessman, large and small, to trade in an atmosphere of freedom from unfair competition and domination by monopolies at home or abroad;

The right of every family to a decent home;

The right to adequate medical care and the opportunity to achieve and enjoy good health;

The right to adequate protection from the economic fears of old age, sickness, accident, and unemployment;

The right to a good education.

All of these rights spell security. And after this war is won we must be prepared to move forward, in the implementation of these rights, to new goals of human happiness and well-being.

America’s own rightful place in the world depends in large part upon how fully these and similar rights have been carried into practice for all our citizens.

For unless there is security here at home there cannot be lasting peace in the world.

One will also note the similarities between both sets of demands with those espoused by Karl Marx in the interest of the establishment of communism:

1)     The abolition of the property/ownership of land.

2)     Income tax to be graded to income – the more an individual earned, the more they paid. The less you earned, the less you paid.

3)     Abolition of all rights of inheritance.

4)     The confiscation of all property of immigrants and rebels.

5)     The centralisation of all credit into the hands of the state by means of a national bank with state capital and an exclusive economy.

6)     Centralisation of all means of communication and transport into the hands of the state.

7)     The extension of factories and the instrument of production owned by the state. Bringing into cultivation all land not being used that could be and an improvement in the fertility of the soil.

8)     The equal obligation of all to work and the establishment of an industrial and agricultural armies.

9)     The combination of agriculture and manufacturing industries with the gradual abolition of the distinction between town and country by the more equable distribution of the population over the country.

10)  Free education for all children in public schools. The abolition of child labour in factories; an educated child would be better for society in the long term, than a child not educated.

This entry was posted in Closed System, Competition, Complexity, Culture Divide, Current Events, Debt Ceiling, Economic Policy, Economic Theory, Federal Budget, Game Theory, Inflation, Interdependency, Keynesianism, Legal Theory, Marxism, Motivation, National Debt, Notable Quotables, Perpetuity, Political Theory, Poverty, Systems Theory, Wealth, Zero-sum. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Occupy Wall Street demands are vaguely familiar

  1. Luke says:

    There is an urgent need to channel the infectious energy of the Wall Street Occupation into a coherent, practical action plan. Precious time is passing. We are striving to assist this process through The American People’s New Economic Charter. It’s an open-sourced, collaborative document with specific demands. You can read the entire doc at http://www.facebook.com/NewEconomicCharter

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